An exhortation

It’s so important to listen to those who love you.

Especially when you think they just don’t understand how you feel.

I know this can be the hardest time to listen—when you’re 100% convinced that no one “gets” you. When you’re absolutely sure that no advice or counsel anyone is giving you will help.

But when you’re feeling this way, you’re in a downward spiral. A bad loop. And almost every time, the only thing that will get you out is somebody else.

That can’t happen if you won’t listen.

The older I get, the more I believe the the pinnacle of maturity is the ability to believe others, even with everything inside of you tells you the opposite.

Being able to recognize, in other words, when what you’re feeling inside—no matter how strong—just isn’t a healthy response to what’s going on around you.

Riva-ligion

I think one of the reasons why PC culture took off so vehemently is because it’s unbelievably horrifying for most people to accept that they are nothing more than an imperfect mound of animal flesh full of biases and prejudices.

I think this can only happen in predominantly atheist places, because there, no God loves you to absolve you from your fleshy pathos and offer you a promise of some form of forthcoming eternal perfection.

Perhaps religion was pragmatically necessary. Otherwise, you’re expecting people to come to terms with having the same fate as a biodegradable shopping bag, and spirituality is more unhealthy.

(That’s from Riva.)

You can only control the process

I copied this from this webpage.


Sports is inherently complex.

There are many variables that affect the outcome of the game. Most of these variables are not within the control of players or the coach. There are too many plays, statistics and countermoves for a person to remember them all. To try and control all of them would be sheer madness.

But after speaking with psychiatry professor Lionel Rosen, Nick Saban realised that the average play in football lasts just seven seconds.

It’s impossible to read and execute every play to perfection for the entire game. But seven seconds? Anyone can do that. Execute, rest, repeat and you eventually have a game.

Excellence is a matter of steps. Excelling at the first thing, then the second, and then the next. The process is about staying in the present and laying siege to the obstacle in front of you. It’s about not getting distracted by anything else that comes your way.

Saban’s teams have done that — and then some. They started by winning games. Now, they are winning championships.